Our Squadron is for all Marines who are or were part of Marine Air Command and Control. The name honors a small team of Marines who created an all weather bombing system in 1949 at Point Magu, California that evolved to become the Air Support Radar Team (ASRT). The equipment was sent to the Korean War as part of the 1st MAW, 1st MTACS. The radio call sign was Devastate Charlie. We are part of the Marine Corps Aviation Association. Click on the MCAA logo below for more information or to join. If you want to post stories or photos send them to craighullinger@gmail.com Semper Fi

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Military Payment Certificates

MPC was used in Vietnam instead of US Dollars.


One of my fun duties in Vietnam MASS-3 in 1970 was to take in and pay out all the old Military Payment Certificates (MPC) with new MPC. We did not use US dollars in Vietnam – instead we used paper dollars, quarters, dimes, and nickels. We were only supposed to use MPC to buy things from military organizations.  This was to reduce black market transactions between the US military and civilians.

With no notice all bases would be “locked down”, with no one permitted to leave or depart. The purpose of this was to screw anyone who was involved with the black market - anyone who was off base could not get back on to base to get their money exchanged. We got the word in the middle of the night. The base was locked down and every Marine had to turn in his MPC in to me. 

Paper nickels, dimes, quarters, and dollars, covered with junk and waded up, were counted out, and I gave each man a receipt. I had over $20,000 in MPC and I kept it in an old metal ammo box. I took the money to Wing Headquarters, counted it to the Wing disbursing office, received new money in the same denominations, and returned and paid each Marine. No mistakes, as I recall. It took me three long days to collect and pay back all the money to each man.

I had paid everyone except a Private named Riley who was in the brig (jail). I did not know him as he had been in the brig before I joined the unit. I went over to the brig to collect his money. I was shocked to see it was a Marine I actually knew very well - we had served together in 5th LAAMBn in Yuma when I was enlisted. I had told when we troops together that he needed to clean up his act and quit drugs. He did not listen then - hope he has cleaned up his act. He was a smart capable guy, just not willing to go along with the Marine program.

Thanks to Bernard Puglisi for sharing.



"Personnel on operation observed 2 enemy moving into a cave. Enemy wearing dark shorts and shirts. 2 rifles of unknown type. Engaged enemy with 8-60 mm, 30-81mm, 15-105's and fixed wing strike of 12-1,000 lb. bombs with excellent coverage of target."

The ordinance described in this report is very impressive, big, loud, and lethal, and probably considered as overkill by the two enemy soldiers.

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